Bubble Sets: Revealing Set Relations with Isocontours over Existing Visualizations

Contributors

Christopher Collins, Gerald Penn, Sheelagh Carpendale

Abstract

While many data sets contain multiple relationships, depicting more than one data relationship within a single visualization is challenging. We introduce Bubble Sets as a visualization technique for data that has both a primary data relation with a semantically significant spatial organization and a significant set membership relation in which members of the same set are not necessarily adjacent in the primary layout. In order to maintain the spatial rights of the primary data relation, we avoid layout adjustment techniques that improve set cluster continuity and density. Instead, we use a continuous, possibly concave, isocontour to delineate set membership, without disrupting the primary layout. Optimizations minimize cluster overlap and provide for calculation of the isocontours at interactive speeds. Case studies show how this technique can be used to indicate multiple sets on a variety of common visualizations.

Publications

  • C. Collins, G. Penn, and S. Carpendale, “Bubble Sets: Revealing Set Relations with Isocontours over Existing Visualizations,” IEEE Trans. on Visualization and Computer Graphics (Proc. of the IEEE Conf. on Information Visualization), vol. 15, iss. 6, p. 1009,1016, 2009.
    [Bibtex] [PDF] [DOI]
    @Article{COL2009c,
      author =    {Christopher Collins and Gerald Penn and Sheelagh Carpendale},
      title =    {Bubble Sets: Revealing Set Relations with Isocontours over Existing Visualizations},
      journal =  {IEEE Trans. on Visualization and Computer Graphics (Proc. of the IEEE Conf. on Information Visualization)},
      year =    2009,
      volume =   15,
      number =  6,
     pages = {1009,1016},
      doi = {10.1109/TVCG.2009.122}
    }

Media

Software

Using prefuse

Source code as an Eclipse project (requires prefuse; I recommend the latest prefuse from the CVS repository, but the beta release will also work.) [v.3 updated 24 November, 2010]

Also, you can now download the code for the papers timeline explorer. It is somewhat messy and depends on the BubbleSets code (above) as well as prefuse and the two jar libraries included in the archive.

As a stand-alone Java library

Bubble Sets library on github (thanks Josua Krause for creating a testing application)!


Acknowledgements

 

Research

EduApps – Supporting Non-Native English Speakers to Overcome Language Transfer Effects

Metatation: Annotation as Implicit Interaction to Bridge Close and Distant Reading

DataTours: A Data Narratives Framework

Perceptual Biases in Font Size as a Data Encoding

Progressive Learning of Topic Modeling Parameters: A Visual Analytics Framework

Abbreviating Text Labels on Demand

NEREx: Named-Entity Relationship Exploration in Multi-Party Conversations

ConToVi: Multi-Party Conversation Exploration using Topic-Space Views

PhysioEx: Visual Analysis of Physiological Event Streams

Using Visual Analytics of Heart Rate Variation to Aid in Diagnostics

Off-Screen Desktop

PivotSlice

Reading Comprehension on Mobile Devices

#FluxFlow: Visual Analysis of Anomalous Information Spreading on Social Media

Optimizing Hierarchical Visualizations with the Minimum Description Length Principle

Lexichrome

SentimentState: Exploring Sentiment Analysis on Twitter

Facilitating Discourse Analysis with Interactive Visualization

DimpVis

Glidgets

TandemTable

Simple Multi-Touch Toolkit

Exploring Text Entities with Descriptive Non-photorealistic Rendering

Investigating the Semantic Patterns of Passwords

Bubble Sets: Revealing Set Relations with Isocontours over Existing Visualizations

Parallel Tag Clouds to Explore Faceted Text Corpora

VisLink: Revealing Relationships Amongst Visualizations

DocuBurst: Visualizing Document Content using Language Structure

Tabletop Text Entry Techniques

Lattice Uncertainty Visualization: Understanding Machine Translation and Speech Recognition

WordNet Visualization

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